The Martin County Water Affordability Report, compiled by Appalachian Citizens’ Law Center’s Deputy Director Mary Cromer and the Martin County Concerned Citizens’ organizer Ricki Draper, was released yesterday following a press conference held on the steps of Kentucky’s State Capitol Building in Frankfort. You can view the full report here. Several media outlets picked up the story:

 

Sydney Boles, Ohio Valley Resource: Water is Unaffordable for Nearly Half of Martin Countians Report Finds: “According to the report, which was produced by the Appalachian Citizens Law Center and the community group Martin County Concerned Citizens, 46 percent of all Martin County residents are paying a share of household income that exceeds the EPA guidelines. Martin County’s poorest residents, those earning less than $10,000 per year, pay as much as 6.5 percent of their income toward water bills.”

 

Will Wright, Lexington Herald-Leader: Kentucky water district known for poor service may become the state’s most expensive: “The report suggests that protections must be put in place for the county’s most vulnerable residents, and urges the PSC to consider affordability when approving rate increases. The report also urges the state legislature to appropriate funds to rebuild the district’s crumbling infrastructure — a move that would veer from the traditional revenue structure of water districts, which rely on rates and grant funding.

‘In high-poverty areas with declining populations, the current funding model will prove to be unsustainable,’ said Mary Cromer, an attorney with the Appalachian Citizens’ Law Center who co-wrote the report.”

 

Christy Bolinger, ABC WTVQ-36: New Report Shows Nearly Half of Martin Co. Can’t Afford Water: “The Water Affordability Crisis in Martin County report was announced in Frankfort at the State Capitol Monday. ‘I don’t think that people that have clean water throughout this state and other states actually realizes what a luxury it is,’ says Mickey McCoy with MCCC. To show how those in Martin County can’t afford the water, Nina McCoy with MCCC, says in July the water district sent out 300 notices of shutting for water for non-payment.”

 

Hillary Thornton, WKYT: Report: Ky. County’s Residents Can’t Afford Water Rate Hike: “A new report on the water crisis in Martin County says its 4,300 households cannot bear the cost burden of much-needed water system improvements. County residents continue to drink bottled water, and many homes have pressure issues or discolored water. About 44% of households have income below $25,000 per year.

The report from the Appalachian Citizens’ Law Center released Monday says water is too expensive for nearly half the county’s residents, based on an Environmental Protection Agency standard.”

 

Lily Bradley, 13 WOWK TV: Report: Martin County Residents Can’t Afford Water Rate Hike: “A new report on the water crisis in Martin County says its 4,300 households cannot bear the cost burden of much-needed water system improvements. County residents continue to drink bottled water, and many homes have pressure issues or discolored water. About 44% of households have income below $25,000 per year.”